Human Slaughter

The Lord’s battles, what are they? Not the garment rolled in blood, not the noise, and smoke, and din of human slaughter. These may be the devil’s battles, if you please, but not the Lord’s. They may be days of God’s vengeance  but in their strife  the servant of   Jesus may not mingle.(“War! War! War!” May 1, 1859)–Charles Spurgeon

hiroshima_afterbomb

Hiroshima After the Bomb, 1945; 70th Anniversary, August 6, 2015

I voiced to him my grave misgivings, first on the basis of my belief that Japan was already defeated and that dropping the bomb was completely unnecessary, and secondly because I thought that our country should avoid shocking world opinion by the use of a weapon whose employment was, I thought, no longer mandatory as a measure to save American lives.

Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower (to Sec. of War before the dropping of the bomb)

 

The Japanese had, in fact, already sued for peace. The atomic bomb played no decisive part, from a purely military point of view, in the defeat of Japan.

— Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz

 

The atomic bomb had nothing to do with the end of the war at all.

— Major General Curtis LeMay

 

The first atomic bomb was an unnecessary experiment … It was a mistake to ever drop it … [the scientists] had this toy and they wanted to try it out, so they dropped it …

— Fleet Admiral William Halsey, Jr
***
Doss2
SpurgeonMeme
 Link to Key Quotes on Christians and war by Charles Spurgeon. Evangelicals ought to have the integrity to read what this giant of the faith said on this subject,
Here:

STAR WARS & Sgt. York

LukeLight

In the aftermath of “Vietnam,” war-weary Americans imbibed a playlist of anti-war movies. All seemed lost for despairing warriors. But, then, STAR WARS burst onto the scene and took the world by storm.

The mud and blood, and the smell of gunpowder and napalm gave way to this cool, clean, antiseptic environment, and lightsabres.

jollyRoger

In another time warp, Cap’n Kidd has again weighed anchor. With the huge success of Hacksaw Ridge, amidst the carnage, Desmond Doss emerges as a real-life hero of the faith. As a pacifist Christian who refuses to ‘bear the sword’ with his fellow soldiers, he suffers alongside them, binding up their wounds and rescuing many from death.

But now we sight the Jolly Roger sailing toward us from beyond the horizon. Under the flag of The Gospel Coalition, Cap’n Kidd’s cannons capture our gaze—enter Sergeant York.

CannonFXembers1

Like the sky-writing of an airplane with its contrail, the smoke of these fantastic cannons spells out, Alvin York, Christian Soldier.

And, yes, Alvin York, like Desmond Doss, was a devout Christian. And both were awarded the Medal of Honor.

I always rejoice to find a soldier a Christian, but I always mourn to find a Christian a soldier,” wrote Charles Spurgeon [of Jaws fame (link); this is Jaws 2].

Like Desmond Doss, Alvin York came from a pacifist church. In 1914, Alvin York became a new Christian at a Church of Christ. The Great War would soon deliver him (and thousands of other men) to boot camp where “an officer convinced him that the Bible endorsed a Christian’s participation in a just war.”

[How many times, recently, have we ‘learned’ the lesson of a person, in authority over others, taking advantage and convincing someone under them to do what they did not want  to do?]

On The Western Front in 1918, a month before the truce, the sharpshooter Corporal York earned the Medal of Honor, killing German soldiers the “way we shoot turkeys at home” and capturing over 130 of them.

But York still struggled with the killings, not entirely sure that God approved of his actions.”–Thomas S. Kidd.

Sgt. Alvin York struggled after the war with the question of giving permission to Hollywood to make a movie about him. He eventually relented in order to support a Bible School. And Gary Cooper won the Academy Award for Best Actor. It was 1941, just in time for WWII.

A big part of the support for WWI came from Christian pastors. (If you would like to get the feel of that, read Mark Twain’s The War Prayer.) Wm. Buckley wrote that World War One was an unnecessary war. It was not a just war. Another described it as “satanic carnage.”

The salt lost its savour. The War to End All Wars and Versailles prepared the seedbed for the rise of a Hitler and World War, Part Two.

Charles Spurgeon [quotes link] concluded his above remark about soldiers with this: “The followers of Christ in these days seem to me to have forgotten a great part of Christianity.

 

479px-Two_young_German_soldiers

GOTT MIT UNS

[about the author]